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Credit | Collegian

Make bac­teria glow in the dark in the mol­e­cular biology lab, throw a dodgeball in uni­versity physics lab, and burn col­orful flames in general chem­istry lab. There is great beauty in the natural world and how we are able to work within it. Man has used the order in the world to make a better life, and let’s face it, lab work is both critical to fur­thering our sci­en­tific knowledge and it’s fun. Becoming well-edu­cated stu­dents in the liberal arts requires gaining the best com­pre­hension of physics, chem­istry, biology, and math available.

Pre-reg­is­tration for the fall semester opens Nov. 8. Next semester or fall, take Chem­istry 201, Biology 200, Math 120, and Physics 101 or 201. Although the classes for non-science majors are fine, it would be better for you and your fellow man to learn the foun­da­tions of sci­en­tific understanding. 

Finding a place for the natural sci­ences in the liberal arts is easy, as the study of math and science pro­vides oper­ative per­spec­tives on the world. The better we under­stand reality, the greater we grasp truth, which is the goal of studying the liberal arts. As a bio­chem­istry major, I am con­stantly amazed at how the smallest changes inside of our cells have pro­found impacts on our well-being. When I study physics, I’m always taken aback when we can predict the exact landing location of a flying bullet using math, even though I know the equa­tions well. 

The truths obtained from sci­en­tific dis­covery have direct con­nec­tions to other sub­jects in the liberal arts. We need science, an objective study, to inform our under­standing of the world, which pro­vides under­standing to improve our pol­itics, inform us of history, create a real­istic framework for phi­losophy, produce great art and music, and, most of all, point us to the Creator. Nobody lib­erally edu­cated should have insuf­fi­cient foun­da­tions in any field, or they will have an incom­plete under­standing of the liberal arts.

For the past year, intense debate over science related to the pan­demic occurred with many unable to sep­arate fact from jar­gonized myth, which is nothing new, but was more intense than pre­vious debates in recent history. A quality edu­cation in science can be of great use in making informed stances on such issues.

Science majors take the same intro-level classes required for human­ities and social science majors and have no problem. Perhaps this means Hillsdale’s science majors have a stronger under­standing of the liberal arts. 

Remember, virtus ten­t­amine gaudet. Live up to the chal­lenge and enroll in the same intro-level classes science majors take.