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Gabrielle Bes­sette prac­tices her videog­raphy in the Christ Chapel. Courtesy | Gabrielle Bessette

Pho­tog­raphy has become a central activity of our lives. We are always behind a phone or camera cap­turing the moments that are in front of us. But I would argue that picture taking is soon to be a thing of the past. The world is moving in a dif­ferent direction — video creation. 

Videog­raphy is superior to pho­tog­raphy for a handful of reasons, reasons that produce both sen­ti­mental and capital gain. 

With the help of your own memory or imag­i­nation, pho­tog­raphy can immerse you in a past moment, but videog­raphy can fully immerse you back in time without those aids. We already see society favoring videog­raphy. For example, wedding video­g­ra­phers are now in high demand alongside pho­tog­ra­phers. While hiring a wedding pho­tog­rapher has been com­mon­place for years, it has its down­sides: photos are still, some­times awkward to pose and capture, less candid, and simply cannot catch every­thing. Not hiring a wedding video­g­rapher is one of the biggest regrets that brides have these days. 

“Ten years ago having a video of your wedding was nearly unheard of,” Hillsdale senior and wedding coor­di­nator Kathryn Swope said. “The oppor­tunity to relive your big day is so pre­cious and some­thing many women wish they had.” 

Swope said she encourages brides who are on the fence about hiring a video­g­rapher to go for it, if there is any way their budget can manage it. 

“It is heart­breaking when I hear brides regret not hiring one, because it is a day you can never re-do,” Swope added.

Videog­raphy is the best method to reflect on mem­ories and special moments. Videos tell the whole story. A pho­to­graph is merely a glimpse of what could have been cap­tured seam­lessly on video. Videog­raphy does not just capture a single moment, but rather a series of moments that create a full story. 

A pho­to­graph is less useful than a video. Major cor­po­ra­tions are catching on to the changing climate and hiring videog­raphy teams to capture every­thing from product releases, con­ven­tions, and launch parties. They are not just doing this for the mem­ories, they are doing this to sig­nif­i­cantly benefit their business. The success is monumental. 

According to a DataBox analysis of social media video versus photo per­for­mance con­ducted in March 2021, videos out­matched photos in all cat­e­gories. Malin Wije­nayake, a paid ads spe­cialist, said fan engagement for a video is sig­nif­i­cantly higher than that of a photo.

“In one par­ticular case for one of my fitness-related clients, an image ad for a product received 777 link clicks, whereas a video for the same product received 1,432 link clicks — almost double,” Wije­nayake reported. By replacing a photo with a video, you can double your audience interaction. 

This is not a rare occur­rence either. According to 2020 AdQuad­rants research on Facebook adver­tising, a video is 20 – 30% more likely to get clicked on than a still image. This is sig­nif­icant for anyone trying to market them­selves, their brand, or their orga­ni­zation. So if you cur­rently own a business, or plan on starting one after college, I encourage you to invest in the mar­keting ben­efits of videog­raphy. The market for video­g­ra­phers is booming, and I am jumping right in. 

Having rec­og­nized the ben­efits of video pro­duction, I made the switch to videog­raphy myself in both my per­sonal and pro­fes­sional life, and I chal­lenge you to stop taking pic­tures and start recording. I have begun filming and editing videos for trips, events, and orga­ni­za­tions. It was a game-changer when I stopped focusing on cap­turing still images and started recording the world I was experiencing. 

Now when I go back and watch my videos, I am reim­mersed into the event, making my mem­ories all the richer. Not only have I seen the ben­efits of per­sonal reflection, but I have also seen first-hand how it has improved my mar­keting capa­bil­ities within my jobs and lead­ership roles. A video­g­rapher can have a huge impact on a team. 

It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words, so in that case, a video must be worth a million. 

 

Gabrielle Bes­sette is a sophomore George Wash­ington Fellow studying political economy.