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Lori Hull manages the Hillsdale Coun­tyFair for the second year. COLLEGIAN | REAGAN GENSIEJEWSKI

The sun sets behind the slowly rotating ferris wheel. Children run from stand to stand, screaming with delight as the smell of kettle corn and freshly-made donuts fills the air.

This image is just a part of the Hillsdale County Fair; the final product of months of hard work by Fair Manager Lori Hull and her staff. 

This will be Hull’s second year as the fair’s manager, but she is far from new to the fair.

“Lori calls herself a ‘fair brat,’” Pres­ident of the Fair Tom Richards said. “She’s been around the fair all her life.” 

Hull was born and raised in Hillsdale County, and, as a child, Hull was a member of 4‑H, a program that helps youth by giving them edu­ca­tional oppor­tu­nities. It also assists them in exploring new interests and dis­cov­ering their pas­sions. Even­tually Hull became a 4‑H leader.

Hull was espe­cially inter­ested in the county fair, and began working her way up the chain of command within the orga­ni­zation, until her oppor­tunity finally came two years ago.

“We were making a manager change,” Richards said. “Lori was also sec­retary of that year, besides being on the board, and I per­sonally felt that she was an awfully good fit for the fair manager job.”

Hull, the first ever female fair manager, is now serving her second year in the position, and she is proud to con­tinue her family’s tra­dition of involvement in the fair. 

“I go back five gen­er­a­tions of exhibitors at the fair, so this is pretty much in our blood; it’s a lifestyle for us,” Hull said. “My fifth gen­er­ation great grand­father was also the manager of the fair back in the late 1800s, so there’s a lot of her­itage here that I take a lot of pride in.”

The fair is far more than just the bright lights and attrac­tions that most attendees see inside the gates. Hull and her staff  plan and prepare for months prior to selling the first ticket.

“Hull gets the property rented out during the summer, and she fills up vendor spaces,” Richards said. “She oversees parking the vendors, as well as the camping. Even though we have a camping person, she still oversees it.”

Hull has gained the rep­u­tation of a com­mitted, hard worker. Her ded­i­cation to both her family and the fair shows in the ‘Most Popular Fair on Earth.’ Junior Sam Roon attended the fair with some friends on Sunday night.

“There were so many food vendors to choose from,” Roon said. “This is the third year I’ve been to the fair, and I feel like it’s a staple part of Hillsdale in the fall.”

Hull said it’s pos­itive reac­tions like this that make her job worth­while. 

“You see it all come together and all the planning and hard work that you see; for the next week people are coming in and enjoying them­selves,” Hull added. “And that’s what it’s all about.”

The sun sets behind the slowly rotating ferris wheel. Children run from stand to stand, screaming with delight as the smell of kettle corn and freshly-made donuts fills the air.

This image is just a part of the Hillsdale County Fair; the final product of months of hard work by Fair Manager Lori Hull and her staff. 

This will be Hull’s second year as the fair’s manager, but she is far from new to the fair.

“Lori calls herself a ‘fair brat,’” Pres­ident of the Fair Tom Richards said. “She’s been around the fair all her life.” 

Hull was born and raised in Hillsdale County, and, as a child, Hull was a member of 4‑H, a program that helps youth by giving them edu­ca­tional oppor­tu­nities. It also assists them in exploring new interests and dis­cov­ering their pas­sions. Even­tually Hull became a 4‑H leader.

Hull was espe­cially inter­ested in the county fair, and began working her way up the chain of command within the orga­ni­zation, until her oppor­tunity finally came two years ago.

“We were making a manager change,” Richards said. “Lori was also sec­retary of that year, besides being on the board, and I per­sonally felt that she was an awfully good fit for the fair manager job.”

Hull, the first ever female fair manager, is now serving her second year in the position, and she is proud to con­tinue her family’s tra­dition of involvement in the fair. 

“I go back five gen­er­a­tions of exhibitors at the fair, so this is pretty much in our blood; it’s a lifestyle for us,” Hull said. “My fifth gen­er­ation great grand­father was also the manager of the fair back in the late 1800s, so there’s a lot of her­itage here that I take a lot of pride in.”

The fair is far more than just the bright lights and attrac­tions that most attendees see inside the gates. Hull and her staff  plan and prepare for months prior to selling the first ticket.

“Hull gets the property rented out during the summer, and she fills up vendor spaces,” Richards said. “She oversees parking the vendors, as well as the camping. Even though we have a camping person, she still oversees it.”

Hull has gained the rep­u­tation of a com­mitted, hard worker. Her ded­i­cation to both her family and the fair shows in the ‘Most Popular Fair on Earth.’ Junior Sam Roon attended the fair with some friends on Sunday night.

“There were so many food vendors to choose from,” Roon said. “This is the third year I’ve been to the fair, and I feel like it’s a staple part of Hillsdale in the fall.”

Hull said it’s pos­itive reac­tions like this that make her job worth­while. 

“You see it all come together and all the planning and hard work that you see; for the next week people are coming in and enjoying them­selves,” Hull added. “And that’s what it’s all about.”