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Sigma Chi house | Hillsdale College

The Greek affil­i­a­tions of Hillsdale stu­dents and alumni are often over­looked, but in many cases, these con­nec­tions are a con­tributing reason to con­tinued success.

Regardless of the letters they wear, Greeks across the business land­scape are proud of and fondly remember their fra­ternity or sorority. This pride pushes them to go above and beyond for their brothers and sisters, which is why alumni con­nec­tions are often so strong within the Greek system. There is some­thing deeper that binds them.

As I reported on Oct. 4, Hillsdale College has built an influ­ential rela­tionship with General Motors  through alumni con­nec­tions, built in part by Hillsdale’s Greek com­munity. Both Director of Employer Rela­tions at Hillsdale College’s Career Ser­vices John Quint and Senior Financial Analyst at Cadillac Michael Koziara were active members of the Sigma Chi fra­ternity during their time on campus. Quint grad­uated in ’09 and Koziara in ’15. Though they did not attend school at the same time, they knew each other through the fra­ternity. This allowed Quint and Koziara to establish a rela­tionship that has employed at least one Hillsdale alumnus each year since Koziara got to GM, rep­re­senting a tan­gible good done for others through the fra­ternity and the college.

Hillsdale stu­dents, past and present, will always feel a con­nection to each other because of their alma mater. But the Greek system takes those con­nec­tions and instills in them an auto­matic level of trust — actives and alumni in the same chapter of a fra­ternity or sorority share a back­ground that goes beyond just Hillsdale College. This bond spans gen­er­a­tions. Being involved in the Greek system may not guar­antee a job oppor­tunity or con­nection with someone in power (nor should it), but it does provide a sense of famil­iarity that could lead to further oppor­tu­nities.

I wore letters when I attended the GM pre­sen­tation during Resume Week on Sept. 28. When the alumni made their intro­duc­tions, Koziara intro­duced himself as a Sigma Chi and greeted me with our motto, “In Hoc.” After the meeting, he came over to where I sat to ask about the chapter’s progress. Though I had never met him, he made it clear he’s invested in me and our house, and wants to see us succeed. This rela­tionship — this broth­erhood — is what binds people together even after college.

When I spoke to Quint, he said of his net­working with Koziara, “The con­nection was Hillsdale first, Sigma Chi was an added bonus.” But added bonuses should not be dis­counted, and the ability to network Greek life encourages should not be ignored.

Ryan Goff is a sophomore studying eco­nomics.