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Chi Omega pancake breakfast attracted stu­dents and com­munity to raise money for Make-A-Wish foun­dation. Madeline Barry | Col­legian

At its annual “ChiHop” pancake breakfast fundraiser Sat­urday, Hillsdale College’s Chi Omega sorority served more than 200 people, raising $1,450 for charity through ticket sales and dona­tions.

The $1,450 is only part of the $6,000 Chi Omega hopes to raise this year, Chi Omega Phil­an­thropy Chair sophomore Claire Gwilt said. According to Jen­nifer Cleary, devel­opment coor­di­nator for Michigan’s Make-A-Wish branch, the funds will cover more than half of the $10,000 needed to grant one wish for a child.

The sisters of Chi Omega commit them­selves to com­munity, campus involvement, and service to others, values that have inspired them to partner with Make-A-Wish Michigan for the last 15 years, Gwilt said.

Through fundraisers like the pancake breakfast, Chi Omega has financed the dreams of children like 17-year-old Skylann, a Michigan high schooler suf­fering from Budd-Chiari Syn­drome, a pos­sibly life-threat­ening disease that narrows and blocks veins in the liver.

Make-A-Wish shared Skylann’s story with Hillsdale’s chapter of Chi Omega to show who the sorority will be helping, though, as a national orga­ni­zation, it cannot direct dona­tions for spe­cific wishes, Cleary said. Skylann, however, will visit the sorority at some point this semester.

While the money raised at ChiHop may not be granting Skylann’s spe­cific wish — a “She Shed” outdoor pool hangout — the funds will go to a similar cause, encour­aging a family dealing a life threat­ening disease.

“Skylann is into music, so a She Shed is a place she can listen to her favorite bands, watch TV and movies, and hang out,” Cleary said. “She will always be dependent on someone her entire life. It’s an oppor­tunity for her to have her own space.”

Nationally, Chi Omega has raised around $17 million for Make-A-Wish, since the sorority held its first fundraiser for the charity in 2001.

“Chi Omega is one of our biggest college sup­porters by far, without a doubt,” Cleary said.