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Junior Dani Morey and sophomore Elena Creed, directors of this year’s annual student-produced one-act plays, have announced their casts. Dani Morey and Elena Creed | Courtesy
Junior Dani Morey and sophomore Elena Creed, directors of this year’s annual student-pro­duced one-act plays, have announced their casts. Dani Morey and Elena Creed | Courtesy
Junior Dani Morey and sophomore Elena Creed, directors of this year’s annual student-produced one-act plays, have announced their casts. Dani Morey and Elena Creed | Courtesy
Junior Dani Morey and sophomore Elena Creed, directors of this year’s annual student-pro­duced one-act plays, have announced their casts. Dani Morey and Elena Creed | Courtesy

A thought-pro­voking jux­ta­po­sition of tragedy and humor awaits those who attend the student-directed one act plays later this semester.

The per­for­mances, cur­rently in the beginning stages of pro­duction and set to hit the Quilhot Black Box Theatre April 7, are the final projects for the stu­dents in Pro­fessor of Theatre George Angell’s yearlong, 400-level theatre class. Junior Dani Morey is directing Jean Anouilh’s “Antigone,” with sophomore Elena Creed over­seeing George Bernard Shaw’s “The Man of Destiny.”

Angell said both “Antigone” and “The Man of Destiny” have a common theme: the use and abuse of per­sonal, absolute power.

“One is a comedy and one is a tragedy, so you get to look at that idea through both lenses,” he said.

In the class, stu­dents have focused on direc­torial script analysis, history of directing, and per­sonal and philo­sophical con­sid­er­a­tions of directing. Angell said he chal­lenged Morey and Creed, the only two stu­dents in the class, to pick more adven­turesome and con­sid­erable plays.

“I told them they could pick far more sub­stantial shows, with more actors and bigger roles,” he said. “Because there are only two, we are going to put a lot more tech­nical details behind it, and spend more money on sets and cos­tumes.”

Angell said stu­dents will also design the cos­tumes and sets, making these per­for­mances full-on student pro­duc­tions.

“They are going to be facing all sorts of problems, but that’s not some­thing I can grade them on,” Angell said.

Morey is directing “Antigone,” French play­wright Anouilh’s rewrite of Sophocles’ original Greek tragedy. Morey said that though this version is largely similar to the original, she hopes the play will leave the audience siding with both Antigone and Creon.

According to Morey, Anouilh wrote the play with a greater focus on char­acter than on set design and stage direction, so she plans to keep the set min­i­malist and mono­chrome. She said she is looking forward to helping her own actors delve into dia­logue and develop the char­acter roles in the play.

“The char­acters are more fleshed out, and I am a very char­acter-driven sort of person,” she said. “I’m more com­fortable acting, but I am hoping to enjoy the directing process.”

Freshman Chandler Lasch will play Antigone, with sophomore Nikolai Dignoti as Creon, junior Eileen Thoma as Ismene, junior Mark Naida as Haemon, freshman Rebecca Carlson as Chorus, Anthony Peterson and Jessica Mac­Farlane as guards, and Maria Kearney as the page.

Morey said she is excited for the audience to expe­rience the odd duo of strong wills and wits that the plays will provide.

“I don’t think we could have planned a better dou­ble­header,” Morey said.

Creed, a sophomore English and theatre major, is directing “The Man of Destiny,” which she described as a “novella for the theater.”

“Shaw is fan­tastic,” she said. “The humor that he uses is really intel­ligent, and it’s just a hys­terical play.”

The crux of the play is a battle of wits between the young general Napoleon Bona­parte, played by sophomore James Young, and a lady, played by senior Megan Scott, who stole his dis­patches. Other char­acters include a lieu­tenant and an innkeeper, played by freshmen Austin Benson and Dylan Strehle respec­tively.

Young said this is his first major role in college, and he is excited yet nervous for the chal­lenge of a four-person show.

“It will be inter­esting to work with people who aren’t pro­fessors directing, and people of dif­ferent expe­rience levels,” he said.

“All of their inter­ac­tions are well-written and fun to listen to and watch,” Creed said.

The plays will run April 7 – 9 in the Quilhot Black Box Theatre at the Sage Center for the Arts.